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What Is ANSI 107?

What is the ANSI 107-2004 Standard? American National Standard for High-Visibility Safety Apparel and Headwear ANSI/ISEA 107-2004 is a voluntary industry consensus standard that specifies the requirements for PPE (personal protective equipment) that is capable of visually signaling the user's presence and represents a revision to the 1999 version. Before the first publication of this standard in 1999 there was no regulation or guideline for the design, performance or materials for high-visibility apparel in the United States. Since 1999, the standard has been recognized by various federal, state and local authorities as well as private industry entities. The PPE covered by this standard are deemed to be effective at mitigating struck-by hazards.
Significant changes to the first edition (ANSI/ISEA 107-1999) include recognition of headwear as high-visibility products, the distinction between woven and knitted fabrics as background material, and removal of previous test criteria that added no value. The appendices have been expanded to include additional examples of garment designs and now include standard test reports and an apparel and headwear compliance certificate.
The ANSI/ISEA 107-2004 standard was developed with the understanding that competing hazards exists for workers that need high-visibility PPE. Other competing hazards such as severe heat/flame exposures require the use of protective garments designed to mitigate heat/flame levels that are addressed in such standards as NFPA 1951, NFPA 1971, NFPA 1977 and NFPA 1999. The use of high-temperature flame and heat-resistant shell materials may not be compatible with fluorescent pigments. Garments used for protection from high-temperature flame and heat, such as first responder protective garments or garments for utility workers, can enhance visibility by incorporating both fluorescent and retro reflective trim to garments worn by workers exposed to the hazards of “low-light conditions” and moving traffic or rescue equipment.
Conspicuity Class 1
Conspicuity level for use in occupational activities which:
1. permit full and undivided attention to approaching traffic;
2. provide ample separation of the pedestrian worker from conflicting vehicle traffic;
3. those exposed to the hazards of warehouse equipment traffic;
4. roadside "right-of-way" or sidewalk maintenance workers; and
5. delivery vehicle drivers.
Examples of pedestrian workers who could work in this class may include:
1. workers directing vehicle operators to parking/service locations;
2. workers retrieving shopping carts from parking areas;
3. those exposed to the hazards of warehouse equipment traffic;
4. roadside "right-of-way" or sidewalk maintenance workers; and
5. delivery vehicle drivers.
Conspicuity Class 2
Conspicuity level for use in occupational activities where risk levels exceeding those in Class 1, such as where:
1. greater visibility is desired during inclement weather conditions;
2. complex backgrounds are present;
3. employees are performing tasks which divert attention from approaching vehicle traffic;
4. vehicle or moving equipment speeds exceeds 25 mph; or
5. work activities take place in or in near proximity to vehicle traffic.
Examples of pedestrian workers in this class may include:
1. roadway construction workers;
2. utility workers;
3. survey crews;
4. railway workers;
5. forestry workers;
6. school crossing guard;
7. parking and/or toll gate personnel; 8. airport baggage handlers/ground crew;
9. emergency response personnel; and
10. law enforcement personnel; and
11. accident site investigators.
Conspicuity Class 3
Conspicuity level for use in occupational activities where risks exceed those in Class 2, such as where:
1. workers are exposed to traffic exceeding 50 mph;
2. the pedestrian worker and vehicle operator have high task loads, clearly placing the pedestrian worker in danger; or
3. the wearer must be conspicuous through the full range of body motions at a minimum of 390 m (1280 feet), and must be identifiable as a person.
Examples of workers in this class may include:
1. roadway construction personnel;
2. utility workers;
3. survey crews;
4. emergency response personnel; and
5. flagging crews.
For more information please contact:
International Safety Equipment Association
1901 N. Moore Street
Arlington, VA 22209 USA
isea@safetyequipment.org